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Translated fiction rules rich literary short list

One of the world’s richest literary prizes, the International Dublin Literary Award, has placed the emphasis on “international” this year, announcing a 10-book shortlist this month with six books in translation on it.

Books written or translated into English are eligible for the award, and are nominated by libraries around the world. Translated books from France, Germany, Mexico, Italy, Norway and South Korea made the shortlist, as well as books from South Africa, the United States and Ireland that had been originally written in English. (Ireland was the only country to place two writers on the shortlist).

Fourteen Canadian books were nominated for the 150-book long list, including Katherena Vermette’s The Break. On a per-capita basis, Icelandic authors did particularly well this year, with three books nominated from a nation of 335,000.

The winner of the $157,000 prize will be announced on June 13.

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Translated fiction rules rich literary short list

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Translated fiction rules rich literary short list

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One of the world’s richest literary prizes, the International Dublin Literary Award, has placed the emphasis on “international” this year, announcing a 10-book shortlist this month with six books in translation on it.

Books written or translated into English are eligible for the award, and are nominated by libraries around the world. Translated books from France, Germany, Mexico, Italy, Norway and South Korea made the shortlist, as well as books from South Africa, the United States and Ireland that had been originally written in English. (Ireland was the only country to place two writers on the shortlist).

Translated fiction rules rich literary short list

Fourteen Canadian books were nominated for the 150-book long list, including Katherena Vermette’s The Break. On a per-capita basis, Icelandic authors did particularly well this year, with three books nominated from a nation of 335,000.

The winner of the $157,000 prize will be announced on June 13.

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Winnipeg writer Jason Stefanik draws inspiration from his North End community and from Elizabethan-era England in a debut poetry collection that’s been hailed by the American website Literary Hub as a book to read for National Poetry Month (celebrated in April in both Canada and the U.S.

Stefanik launches Night Became Years (Coach House Press) Friday at 7 p.m. at the Edge Gallery (611 Main St.). The book explores his mixed Indigenous/European heritage along with alchemy, Reformation-era witch hunts and more.

The launch will be an evening of poetry, visual art and music, with several guest artists featured.

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Globe and Mail columnist Elizabeth Renzetti draws on years of reporting and commentary on feminist issues in her new essay collection Shrewed: A Wry and Closely Observed Look at the Lives of Women and Girls (House of Anansi).

She’ll discuss the book with Winnipeg Free Press columnist Jen Zoratti on Monday at 7 p.m. at McNally Robinson Booksellers’ Grant Park location.

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One of the world’s most popular crime novelists visits McNally Robinson’s Grant Park location on Tuesday at 7 p.m. to discuss her latest works, The Good Daughter and The Kept Woman.

Karin Slaughter has been published in 120 countries and sold more than 35 million copies of books such as Cop Town (being developed for film or television) and Pretty Girls.

In her Winnipeg visit, presented by the Winnipeg International Writers Festival, she’ll talk with local thriller writer J.H. Moncrieff.

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Winnipeg poet Brenda Sciberras takes inspiration from legends of stage and screen including Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Leonard Cohen and David Bowie in her latest collection, Starland (Turnstone Press).

A past winner of the Eileen McTavish Sykes Award for best first book, Sciberras explores how stars express our pain and lighten our lives, yet live in a world of false hope and unfulfilled dreams. She launches the book Wednesday at 7 p.m. at McNally Robinson’s Grant Park location.

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A long-distance mother-daughter correspondence is at the heart of a new memoir by University of Winnipeg professor Kathleen Venema, entitled Bird-Bent Grass: A Memoir, in Pieces (Wilfrid Laurier Press).

When she went to Uganda as a teacher in the late 1980s, Venema exchanged some 300 letters with her mother, Geeske Venema-deJong.

Images and insights from those letters are combined with those from conversations decades later in the memoir, being launched Friday at 7 p.m. at McNally Robinson’s Grant Park location.

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